certainty


certainty
certainty, certitude, assurance, conviction are comparable when denoting a state of mind in which one is free from doubt.
Certainty and certitude both imply the absence of all doubt as to the truth of something; they are not always distinguishable in use, although philosophers and psychologists have often tried to distinguish the states of mind which they designate. The psychological differentiation of certainty as the state of mind induced by something of which there is objectively as well as subjectively not the slightest question, from certitude as the state of mind of one whose faith or belief is so strong that it resists all attack, has indubitably affected the meanings and the use of these terms in general use
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some philosophies tend to destroy man's certainty of his own existence

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one has certainty of nothing in the future, even that the sun will rise tomorrow, but that does not weaken one's certitude that the world will go on indefinitely

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certitude is not the test of certainty. We have been cocksure of many things that were not so— Justice Holmes

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Certitude is usually more personal and less objective than certainty and suggests deeper roots for one's freedom from doubt and less likelihood of a change of belief
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one thing, however, we feel with irresistible certitude, that Mark Twain's fate was once for all decided there— Brooks

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In its greater objectivity certainty also provides a term that may logically designate the quality of a thing believed
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certitude is a mental state: certainty is a quality of propositions— Newman

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the suspense which was more terrible than any certaintyGlasgow

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Assurance (see also CONFIDENCE 2) stresses sureness and confidence rather than certainty; the grounds of such sureness need not be objective proofs or the evidence of one's senses, for something of which one has assurance is typically something that is indemonstrable or is yet to happen; the word usually suggests implicit reliance on oneself or on one's powers, one's intuitions, or one's methods or complete trust in another (as a source of information, a supporter, a sovereign, or God)
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I'll make assurance double sure, and take a bond of fate— Shak.

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faith is the assurance of things hoped for— Heb 11:1 (RV)

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rather, it might be said that he went beyond hope to the assurance of present happiness— More

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Conviction usually implies previous doubt or uncertainty. It involves the idea of certitude but is not its equivalent, for certitude may or may not imply a rational basis for one's freedom from doubt, and conviction (see also OPINION) usually does. It differs from certainty in stressing one's subjective reaction to evidence rather than the objective validity of the evidence itself. Conviction is therefore commonly applied to the state of mind of one who has been or is in the process of being convinced
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have lost the old American conviction that most people are good and that evil is merely an accident— Malcolm Cowley

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she does not wish me to go unless with a full conviction that she is right— Conrad

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Analogous words: *belief, faith, credence: proof, demonstration (see under PROVE)
Antonyms: uncertainty
Contrasted words: doubt, skepticism, mistrust (see UNCERTAINTY)

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Certainty — series Agnosticism Belief Certainty Doubt Determinism Epistemology Estimation Fallibilism …   Wikipedia

  • certainty — I noun absence of doubt, absolute confidence, absoluteness, assurance, assuredness, authoritativeness, certification, certitude, certus, complete conviction, conclusiveness, confidentness, conviction, corroboration, definiteness, firmness,… …   Law dictionary

  • certainty — certainty, certitude Leaving aside special meanings in philosophy, both words imply the absence of doubt about the truth of something, but certitude is a more subjective feeling whereas certainty is, strictly speaking, verifiable. In practice,… …   Modern English usage

  • Certainty — Cer tain*ty, n.; pl. {Certainties}. [OF. certainet[ e].] 1. The quality, state, or condition, of being certain. [1913 Webster] The certainty of punishment is the truest security against crimes. Fisher Ames. [1913 Webster] 2. A fact or truth… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • certainty — [sʉrt′ ntē] n. [ME certeinte < OFr certaineté] 1. the quality, state, or fact of being certain 2. pl. certainties anything certain; definite act of a certainty Archaic without a doubt; certainly SYN. CERTAINTY suggests a firm, settled belief… …   English World dictionary

  • certainty — c.1300, certeynte, surety, pledge, from Anglo Fr. certeinté (late 13c.), O.Fr. certaineté certainty, from L. or V.L. *certanitatem (Cf. O.Sp. certanedad); see CERTAIN (Cf. certain). Meaning that which is certain is attested from early 14c.;… …   Etymology dictionary

  • certainty — [n1] positive assurance all sewn up*, authoritativeness, belief, certitude, cinch, confidence, conviction, credence, definiteness, dogmatism, faith, firmness, indubitableness, inevitability, lock*, lockup*, open and shut case*, positiveness,… …   New thesaurus

  • certainty — ► NOUN (pl. certainties) 1) the quality or state of being certain. 2) a fact that is true or an event that is definitely going to take place …   English terms dictionary

  • certainty — n. 1) absolute, dead; mathematical; moral certainty 2) certainty of (there is no certainty of success) 3) certainty that + clause (there is no certainty that an agreement will be reached) 4) with certainty (to state with certainty) * * * [… …   Combinatory dictionary

  • certainty — noun ADJECTIVE ▪ absolute, complete ▪ near, reasonable, virtual ▪ It s a virtual certainty that essential foodstuffs will go up in price. ▪ moral …   Collocations dictionary


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